Quinquilharias

The box of random things in the attic

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arminsarmy:

marielovesgroban:

Don’t forget we have to wake up Green Day tomorrow.

Ok just a reminder to everyone: If you’re planning on tweeting billie joe armstrong “wake up” or something tomorrow, DON’T. The song is about his father’s death and so it’s really personal and treating it like a joke isn’t the right thing to do. Plus he’s asked so many times for people to stop and no one listens so yeah. Please don’t do that.

(via queerlocus)

Filed under don't do the thing

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my school just sent a flier via e-mail to ask for lgbt allies to make a poster…

like, it’s great that you want to encourage allyship but, what about our actual lgbt students…?

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drew a vent art. what it feels like when i have brain fog. more often than not it feels like brain static or bees buzzing around. the past few days have been full of loud static, it’s impossible to concentrate on anything. when it’s not static it’s hazy or cloudy. the only thing that eases it is sleep because at least then i don’t have to be conscious for it. i wish my brain would work.

drew a vent art. what it feels like when i have brain fog. more often than not it feels like brain static or bees buzzing around. the past few days have been full of loud static, it’s impossible to concentrate on anything. when it’s not static it’s hazy or cloudy. the only thing that eases it is sleep because at least then i don’t have to be conscious for it. i wish my brain would work.

120 notes

The Fault in Our Stars: Why It Matters

bravely-sings-the-nightingale:

I casually tell my friend (after watching a really emotional episode of Orphan Black) that I was not prepared to handle this weekend when I walked into it. This lead us to a discussion about The Fault in Our Stars, which opened in theaters last night. He says to me “Really? You’re going to see that? It’s so pretentious…” And to some extent, he might actually be right, but it’s important too.

In October of 2012, I read the book for the first time, I tell this friend. Three short months later, I found out I had cancer. During my treatment, my mom read it, and when I was out of treatment, my grandmother read it too. Both were floored and moved by the book, and a lot of people have been, but you know, that’s still not what makes the book important.

My friend listens patiently as I explain the following to him:

  • If you’re a person over 40 years old (and in some cases over thirty), there exists and abundance of resources to cope with a diagnosis that may or may not cost you your life.
  • If you’re a person under 13 years of age, there exist an abundance of resources for the cancer patient as well as their families to assist in coping with the diagnosis.
  • If you are between the ages of 14-38, there are approximately 3 websites, a mentoring program that may or may not be within range of where you live, and there are limited scholarships for survivors of cancer (or at least this has been my experience).

The thing is, it’s hard at any age, but the thing that separates these three groups is that in the first scenario, more mature cancer patients have had the chance to lead a life that was not governed by fear of recurrence. In the second case, some children are likely to forget little bits and pieces along the way. What’s difficult about being in that middle bracket is the constant, looming fear that you’re stuck with for the rest of your natural life. What if it comes back? What if this, what if that? It’s overwhelming.

His counter argument is “It’s great that you know all that, but I don’t think a lot of people are aware that this is an issue.”

He’s right.

It’s nothing new, this demographic of mid-life-stage cancer patients. Teenagers and twenty-somethings have been victims for years. But the problem is that virtually nothing has changed in that time. The older generation thinks “You’re still just a kid. Get out, live your life. Don’t worry about that nonsense. It’s not going to happen to you.” And I know because I’ve seen it in the faces of doctors who refused to acknowledge cancer could be a possibility. I’ve seen it in the faces of family friends and former bosses. “You’re so young though! How?!”

"I don’t know. It could’ve been that time I rolled in radioactive waste as a kid. I guess the whole super power thing isn’t really working out for me."

The Fault in Our Stars is a romance between two teenagers falling in love in the face of disease and that’s a pretty powerful image right there, isn’t it? But it’s not all that matters. It’s so much bigger than that, at least for me it is.

It’s the start of something larger. It’s not the first thing or even the second to shed a tiny light on the issue of teenagers and young adults with cancer, that much I know. But even if it only points a miniscule little pin light on the situation, it means it’s the start of something bigger.

J.K. Rowling’s novels inspired the Harry Potter Alliance which sets about to do good deeds. Suzanne Collins’ novels inspired We Are the Districts, where people can choose a district and target problems like education, media access, health care, in their own communities.

I’m sure a lot of people will leave theaters this weekend with tears in their eyes thinking they’ve had a profound and transcendent experience. But I can’t stress nearly enough how important it is to me that people leave the theater with a desire to take part in something that will improve lives for hundreds and thousands of teenagers and young adults all over the world. Bake sales, Cure Search walks, Relay for Life, starting support groups, making blankets, jewelry, etc. to sell to raise money for cancer research. Donate your hair to the Pantene Beautiful Lengths campaign (which is better than Locks of Love because they don’t charge cancer patients for the wigs themselves).

There is so much you can do not just for kids with cancer, but for teens and young adults too.

I can’t stress enough why it’s important to me that The Fault in Our Stars is a thing that exists. I can’t stress enough how important books like This Star Won’t Go Out and Regine’s Book exist, or Zach Sobiech’s mother’s new book. Each of these is so important and my hope is that with each little light that shines on this subject, someday people won’t feel so alone. Someday there will be resources and support for young people.

We may be “close” to finding the cure, but in the meantime, bridging that gap with these resources is going to be crucial.

And you know, my own memories haunt me. They haunt me all the time. I wake up flinching in the middle of the night because I can feel pain like nails in my bones. I come home from work and my feet feel like they’re on fire. I write about these things so that the hurt wasn’t for nothing. I write about these things so that other people will know that I have felt them too, and they are not alone. Because in the words of John Green, "It’s going to hurt. It’s going to hurt because it matters."

I’m striving to make a difference. Are you?

Filed under tfios/ bad cancer feels good cancer feels? this book is the realest shit i ever read let me tell ya

888 notes

captain-rel:


"We lift them all aboard the ship and take off fast as we can! And that’s when he spoke to me.~Palomo, come closer.~ It was my Captain! I leaned in… ‘DON’T SPEAK TUCKER. YOU NEED YOUR STRENGTH.’But he brushed my hand aside, looked me straight in the eye, and said, “Palomo…Ya did good kid. Ya did good.””AW THAT’S BULLSHIT! What I actually told you, was to stop crying, and to shut the fuck up.”"Okay, yEaH, but, the sentiment was still there."

In commemoration of that scene where we were like TUCKER’S NOT DEAAAAAD WOOOOOO

captain-rel:

"We lift them all aboard the ship and take off fast as we can! And that’s when he spoke to me.
~Palomo, come closer.~ It was my Captain! I leaned in… ‘DON’T SPEAK TUCKER. YOU NEED YOUR STRENGTH.’
But he brushed my hand aside, looked me straight in the eye, and said, “Palomo…Ya did good kid. Ya did good.”

AW THAT’S BULLSHIT! What I actually told you, was to stop crying, and to shut the fuck up.”

"Okay, yEaH, but, the sentiment was still there."

In commemoration of that scene where we were like TUCKER’S NOT DEAAAAAD WOOOOOO

(via queerlocus)

Filed under Red vs. Blue rvb12 spoilers

58 notes

"Early" does not mean "better."

yactalks:

When I tell people about my cancer experience, I usually add in something like:

  • It was a really tiny tumor.
  • I just went through one round of radiation.
  • They found it early.
  • It had the potential to be much worse in a couple years.

Why do I say that?? Why do I downplay my cancer? I’m now 100% dependent on a tiny pink pill every morning for the rest of my life (if I were to miss 3 days of it, I’d probably be close to dead. Not kidding.). I know the truth of my condition post-cancer, so why do I lie to other people about it?

The real answer? I’m a people-pleaser. I hate seeing other people upset or uncomfortable - so much so that I carefully choose how I present my cancer story and current condition to them.

But now I’ve decided that I need to stop. I didn’t suffer for years (pre-and post-diagnosis) just to pat others on the back and say “It’s okay now!” because it’s not. It’s not okay. I wasn’t okay then, and I’m not okay now. I might have found my cancer early, but that only set me up for more years of pills, blood tests, shots, fatigue, and nightmares and chances of recurrence.

"Early" does not mean "better."

Filed under bad cancer feels basically... tbh the cancer part was the least worst part of all this it was still shitty as hell

14 notes

Brazilian Cuture: Differences #4

brazilspill:

In English there’s a tradition of referring to a married woman by her husband’s name (i.e. “Oh, I can’t wait to become Mrs. John Smith!”). It may be somewhat outdated, but is is nevertheless a tradition that people are still familiar with and thus would understand who you’re talking about).

In Brazil this form of address has never been used, and would be considered extremely bizarre and confusing. If you were ever to use it n Brazil people’s reactions would probably be

image

"Wait, Mrs. John Smith? Why does she have a male name if she’s a woman…?”

image

Filed under same???? THE MOST CONFUSING THING if i ever marry a man dont you DARE refer to me by my husbands name i will punch you

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there are songs that make you cry when you hear them

and there are songs that make you cry when you think about them